lokameditation:

This Vedic routine is a beautiful way to start each morning, adding to the benefits of meditation and making you feel fresh, connected and full of creativity for the day. Do what you can fit into your current schedule, starting piece by piece till it becomes a habit. Radical change can cause more stress then good, so integrate this routine part by part. It might look like a lot but trust me, it doesn’t take long. And damn do you feel good when you do it.

RISE WITH THE SUN (Vata time is 2am - 6am)

Waking just before the sun rises allows you to take the light, fresh and creative energy of the VATA dosha with you throughout the day. It is an hour of stillness and purity. Rest a few moments before you arise thinking positive and happy thoughts for the day.

CLEAN YOUR TONGUE

Scraping your tongue each morning removes toxins that have accumulated in the body over night from undigested food or experiences. Try it out and see what you scrape off… you’ll never not scrape again. Tongue scrapers can be bought here.

CLEANSE WITH A DRINK

Drink a full glass of warm water with lemon (ginger optional), wait 5-10mins then go to the bathroom to cleanse the insides of your body. The more you do this routine, the easier a morning evacuation will become.

SELF MASSAGE

Daily Abhyanga massage is a powerful self-healing Ayurvedic modality. It connects you to your body, facilitates in the removal of toxins, enlivens your senses and creates flow and movement. If you don’t have time for a whole body massage (usually takes about 10-20min) simply focus on your belly for 5 minutes. Massage is such a great way to become aware of your own body and how you’re feeling so that during the day you make more self-aware decisions that are really going to be of benefit rather than living solely from your mind. Belly massage video here and more videos on the incredible Damian Hagglund’s website here.

SHOWER

Water purification is a daily ritual in India, and although you might not be able to dip into the Holy Ganges each day, having a morning shower will do the trick. Feeling cleansed and purified you are fresh and ready to start your morning meditation program.

YOGA ASANA (10-30min)

Starting the day with some simple yoga asanas is highly beneficial. You don’t have to attend a yoga class, or push out a 90min hot yoga session to be ‘doing yoga’ and gaining its benefits. It’s actually more beneficial if you are calm, relaxed and doing yoga as if you were ‘swimming in a warm ocean watching the sun rise with a smile on your face.’ Start with a few repetitions of the Sun Salutation (facing the sun), or any other gentle yoga asana sequence you have been taught. It’s the morning and the body may be slightly stiff, so take it easy, be kind and caring to yourself and allow the energy in your body to flow.

PRANAYAMA BREATHING (2-5min)

Pranayama breathing techniques help in purifying the subtle bodies and bring coherence to your brain. There are a wide variety of breathing techniques; ask your yoga or meditation teacher to suggest a technique that will benefit you in calming the body and mind before you dive into meditation.

MEDITATION 

Doing yoga asana and pranayama prepares your body and mind to transcend in meditation. When we meditate we have no expectations, no preferences for a certain experience and no preconceived ideas of what is going to happen. We let go, surrender to the moment and go with the flow of natures intelligence. It’s all about easy and effortless repetition of the mantra and a nonchalant attitude to thoughts. If you need any help with your practice get in contact with your teacher or email me here.

BREAKFAST

Nourish your cleansed body with a beautiful meal. Eat a medium sized breakfast (lunch should be your biggest meal) or if you’re not that hungry have a blended drink. Eat with the seasons, with your body type and with what FEELS good. Trust your intuition and listen to what your body wants - that’s why we do this morning routine and why we meditate! It’s all about connecting to your innate sense of wisdom. Eat something that tastes amazing, that pleases all your senses and will give you energy for the day.

WASH HANDS AND BRUSH TEETH

Hygiene is important. You’ve cleansed your body in the shower, mind in meditation, and now we clean our hands and teeth after a delicious breakfast.

DRESS WITH CARE

Dress yourself and allow your style to be an expression of your truest self. Colour is a powerful tool in reflecting and altering your mood so pay attention to how you clothe yourself. Be comfortable and confident and allow fashion to be a tool of self expression.

DIGESTIVE WALK (20min)

Walk briskly for about 20 minutes or so after you’ve had breakfast to aid in digestion and stimulate the release of good endorphins throughout the body. In Ayurveda, when you are exercising your heart rate should increase but not to the point that you wouldn’t be able to have a conversation with the person next to you. Be easy, be calm and allow your senses to absorb the incredible world around you as you briskly walk around your suburb, to the train station or wherever you need to be next.

ENJOY YOUR DAY!

Part 2 of the Vedic day coming up next.

(Source: lokameditation, via vivalageekchic)

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ankara shoes by faith emmanuels
Submitted by : askbellebaks

All Things Naija

numbla:

numbla:

ankara shoes by faith emmanuels

Submitted by : askbellebaks

All Things Naija

"The victim who is able to articulate the situation of the victim has ceased to be a victim: he or she has become a threat."

James Baldwin (via queerbookclub)

OMG so much yes!

(Source: junkycosmonaut, via praggnificent)

thepeoplesrecord:

18 US Veterans Kill Themselves Each Day | Democracy Now September 5, 2012
The month of July set a record high for the number of suicides in the U.S. military. An Army report reveals a total of 38 troops committed suicide last month, including 26 active-duty soldiers and 12 Army National Guard or reserve members — more soldiers than were killed on the battlefield. 
The reasons for the increase in suicides are not fully understood. Among explanations, studies point to combat exposure, post-traumatic stress, misuse of prescription medications and personal financial problems. Army data suggest soldiers with multiple combat tours are at greater risk of committing suicide. 
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta addressed the issue in June at the annual conference on suicide prevention in the military, saying, “Despite the increased efforts, the increased attention, the trends continue to move in a troubling and tragic direction.” We speak with Marguerite Guzmán Bouvard, whose new book is called “The Invisible Wounds of War: Coming Home from Iraq and Afghanistan.”
AMY GOODMAN: The month of July set a record high for the number of suicides in the U.S. military. An Army report revealed a total of 38 troops—26 active-duty soldiers, another 12 National Guard or reserve members—are believed to have committed suicide in July, the highest rate recorded in a month since the Army started tracking detailed statistics on such deaths. More U.S. soldiers died in July by taking their own lives than on the battlefield.
We recently spoke to Iraq War veteran  Aaron Hughes  about suicides in the military.
AARON HUGHES: Every day in this country 18 veterans are committing suicide. Seventeen percent of the individuals that are in combat in Afghanistan, my brothers and sisters, are on psychotropic medication. Twenty to 50 percent of the individuals that are getting deployed to Afghanistan are already diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, military sexual trauma or a traumatic brain injury. Currently one-third of the women in the military are sexually assaulted. It’s clear that these policies of the global war on terror has had a profound effect on the military, my brothers and sisters, while simultaneously perpetuating a failed policy. And unfortunately, we have to live with that failed policy on a daily basis, and we don’t want to be a part of that failed policy anymore.
Full interview
“Support our troops” really does end when they are no longer soldiers. 

thepeoplesrecord:

18 US Veterans Kill Themselves Each Day | Democracy Now 
September 5, 2012

The month of July set a record high for the number of suicides in the U.S. military. An Army report reveals a total of 38 troops committed suicide last month, including 26 active-duty soldiers and 12 Army National Guard or reserve members — more soldiers than were killed on the battlefield.

The reasons for the increase in suicides are not fully understood. Among explanations, studies point to combat exposure, post-traumatic stress, misuse of prescription medications and personal financial problems. Army data suggest soldiers with multiple combat tours are at greater risk of committing suicide.

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta addressed the issue in June at the annual conference on suicide prevention in the military, saying, “Despite the increased efforts, the increased attention, the trends continue to move in a troubling and tragic direction.” We speak with Marguerite Guzmán Bouvard, whose new book is called “The Invisible Wounds of War: Coming Home from Iraq and Afghanistan.”

AMY GOODMAN: The month of July set a record high for the number of suicides in the U.S. military. An Army report revealed a total of 38 troops—26 active-duty soldiers, another 12 National Guard or reserve members—are believed to have committed suicide in July, the highest rate recorded in a month since the Army started tracking detailed statistics on such deaths. More U.S. soldiers died in July by taking their own lives than on the battlefield.

We recently spoke to Iraq War veteran  Aaron Hughes  about suicides in the military.

AARON HUGHES: Every day in this country 18 veterans are committing suicide. Seventeen percent of the individuals that are in combat in Afghanistan, my brothers and sisters, are on psychotropic medication. Twenty to 50 percent of the individuals that are getting deployed to Afghanistan are already diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, military sexual trauma or a traumatic brain injury. Currently one-third of the women in the military are sexually assaulted. It’s clear that these policies of the global war on terror has had a profound effect on the military, my brothers and sisters, while simultaneously perpetuating a failed policy. And unfortunately, we have to live with that failed policy on a daily basis, and we don’t want to be a part of that failed policy anymore.

Full interview

“Support our troops” really does end when they are no longer soldiers. 

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via descentintotyranny)

lemme-holla-at-you:

Zuhair Murad S/S 2013

(Source: vincecarters, via aboutbirthdaysandweddings)